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Pantone features Ultra Violet for 2018

Pantone features Ultra Violet for 2018

As part of a yearly tradition renowned across several design-centric and creative industries, Pantone has announced that Ultra Violet will be its 2018 Color of the Year. Each year's decision is based on comprehensive trend analysis and a specific theme - this year, Pantone looks out toward the unknown and undiscovered.

"Complex and contemplative, Ultra Violet suggests the mysteries of the cosmos, the intrigue of what lies ahead, and the discoveries beyond where we are now," reads the announcement on Pantone's website. "The vast and limitless night sky is symbolic of what is possible and continues to inspire the desire to pursue a world beyond our own."

Pantone's Color of the Year selections are intended to be reflections of the current moods, fashions and foremost concepts in the world at the time. In selecting Ultra Violet, Pantone pays homage to the artistic influences of recently departed cultural icons such as David Bowie and Prince, as well as guitar legend Jimi Hendrix, whose usage of Ultra Violet shades are still remembered today as expressions of their individuality.

"Enigmatic purples have also long been symbolic of counterculture, unconventionality, and artistic brilliance," the announcement by Pantone reads. "Nuanced and full of emotion, the depth of PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet symbolizes experimentation and non-conformity, spurring individuals to imagine their unique mark on the world, and push boundaries through creative outlets."

Other brands, such as Sherwin Williams, also offer their visions of prominent colors every year. This year, the paint producer named Oceanside, a rich, blue/green tone, as its Color of the Year for 2018.

Last year, Pantone was inspired by nature to select Greenery as its 2017 Color of the Year. For more information on Ultra Violet and previous selections for Color of the Year, visit Pantone's website.
  • Kristin Ego
Allium 'Millenium' named 2018 Perennial of the Year

Allium 'Millenium' named 2018 Perennial of the Year

The Perennial Plant Association has awarded the title Perennial Plant of the Year® 2018 to Allium ‘Millenium’. This herbaceous perennial, relative to the common onion, is a workhorse of the late summer garden. Bred by Mark McDonough, horticulture researcher from Massachusetts, ‘Millenium’ was introduced through Plant Delights Nursery in 2000 where it has proven itself year after year earning rave reviews. ‘Millenium’ is spelled with one “n”, as registered, but is occasionally incorrectly listed with two “n”s. This cultivar is the result of a multigenerational breeding program involving Allium nutans and A. lusitanicum (formerly Allium senescens ssp montanum), selected for late flowering with masses of rose-purple blooms, uniform habit with neat shiny green foliage that remains attractive season long, and for its drought resistant constitution.

The genus Allium contains more than 900 species in the northern hemisphere, but is perhaps best known for a dozen or so species of culinary vegetables and herbs: onion, garlic, leeks, shallots, scallions, and chives. The genus is also known for a few dozen ornamentals that grow from bulbs and sport tall stems with big globe-shaped blooms in spring. The vast majority of the genus is little known and absent from horticulture, yet possesses significant ornamental potential.

Allium ‘Millenium’ has numerous virtues to add to the landscape setting. Growing best in full sun, each plant typically produces an upright foliage clump of grass-like, glossy deep green leaves reaching 10-15” tall in spring. In midsummer, two to three flower scapes rise above the foliage with each scape producing two or three showy two-inch spherical umbels of rose-purple florets that last as long as four weeks. The flower umbels are completely round (spherical), not domed or hemispherical as they are in some Allium species. They dry to a light tan often holding a blush of their former rose-purple color. While other alliums can look scraggly in the heat of the summer, ‘Millenium’ does not let the heat bother it! Easily grown in zones 4-9 (possibly zone 3) makes it a great perennial in many areas of the country. In very hot summer climates it does appreciate afternoon shade.

No serious pest problems have been reported. Leaf spot may occur in overcrowded growing conditions. Deer and rabbits leave ‘Millenium’ alone. Alliums are sometimes avoided due to their reseeding behavior. Fortunately ‘Millenium’ exhibits 50% reduced seed production, raising less concern for self-sown seedlings.

Allium ‘Millenium’ has a fibrous root structure forming an ornamental herbaceous clump easily propagated by division. Once in the garden, ‘Millenium’ can easily be lifted and divided in either spring or fall. Cut back foliage in late fall.

Pollinators will flock to Allium ‘Millenium’! Butterflies and bees will thank you for adding ‘Millenium’ to your garden. Pair with shorter goldenrods (Solidago sp.) such as ‘Little Lemon’ that reaches one and a half feet tall. Goldenrods are late summer pollinator magnets that will offer beautiful contrasting golden yellow blooms. Another late summer re-blooming companion perennial to consider is Oenothera fremontii ‘Shimmer’ with its low-growing silvery foliage adorned daily with large yellow flowers that open late afternoon and fade to an apricot color by morning. Being tap-rooted this evening primrose is well behaved, not creeping through the garden, for which, rhizomatous spreading evening primroses are famously known. Allium ‘Millenium’ looks great backed with the silver foliage of Perovskia atriplicifolia, Russian sage, or the native Scutellaria incana, downy skullcap, with its numerous spikes of blue flowers above trim green foliage. Or simply plant ‘Millenium’ en masse and enjoy the rose-purple display!

This low-maintenance dependable perennial will not disappoint! Blooming at a time when most of our garden begins to decline in the tired excess of the season, ‘Millenium’ offers much needed color. It is truly an all-season plant that offers attractive shiny foliage spring through summer and caps off the season with its crown of perfectly round rose-purple flower umbels!

Hardiness
USDA Zones 3 or 4 to 9

Light
Allium ‘Millenium’ grows best in full sun. In very hot climates partial shade may be best.

Soil
Grows best in well-drained soils.

Uses
Allium ‘Millenium’ is a perfect selection for full-sun gardens where its sleek structure can complement many other growth habits. Cut flowers retain a blush of their summer color.

Unique Qualities
Allium ‘Millenium’ is a butterfly magnet. The plant is interesting through multiple seasons for both foliage and large, gorgeous blooms. Reseeding is much less a problem than in other alliums.

Maintenance
Allium ‘Millenium’ is subject to no serious insect or disease problems. Deer and rabbits usually avoid ‘Millenium’.


Martha A. Smith, Horticulture Educator, University of Illinois Extension

Mark McDonough, Plant breeder/horticulture researcher, Massachusetts

  • Kristin Ego
Closed for the Season

Closed for the Season

Thank you to all our wonderful staff and customers for your support through 2017.  We are closed at the shop and greenhouse until late March/early April but will be working away in the new year getting plants growing for the coming spring.  

If you need to contact us during the winter months, please email info@egosgardencentre.com

See you in the spring!

P.S.  Gift Certificates are available to order on our website anytime and can be delivered by mail :-)

  • Kristin Ego
Progressive Sale Starts December 15th!

Progressive Sale Starts December 15th!

For the last nine days of our 2017 season, all Christmas decor and decorations, napkins, candles, wooden signs, lights, seasonal plants, cut greens and arrangements, wreaths, and Christmas bulbs (Paper Whites and Amaryllis) are all on sale!!!

December 15-17   30% off

December 18-20   40% off

December 21-23   50% off

Cash and carry.  Excludes all custom orders, everyday decor and woollens.

OPEN DAILY 10:00-5:00 until December 23rd

  • Kristin Ego
Register Now for Winter Workshops!

Register Now for Winter Workshops!

While it may officially still be fall, a chilly weekend with snow helps to get us focused on the season to come!  

We have started to book our seasonal workshops for late November and December.  This year we have added a couple of fun ones for kids as well... Grinch Tree and "Rudolph".  These ones can be a fun project for children to do with a bit of help from an adult (Hey Grandma!).  

Registration is available online or stop by the shop :-)  We are currently open 10:00-5:00 daily... until December 23. 

  • Kristin Ego
Plant Fall bulbs now for spring colour!

Plant Fall bulbs now for spring colour!

Fall is the time to think ahead to next spring if you want colourful Daffodils, Tulips, Crocuses and more to enjoy once the snow has left.

Hardy fall bulbs such as daffodil, tulip, hyacinth, crocus and snowdrop are spring flowering plants that must be planted in the fall. They are mostly native to mountainous areas of Europe and the near east — Spain, Turkey and Afghanistan. They actually need the dormant rest period of a long, cold winter. The melting snow and ice in early spring provide needed moisture as they start to grow and flower. Plant from September to December, even after the first frost if the ground can still be worked.


Planting
Bulbs can also be planted in individual holes. Dig a hole and sprinkle a tablespoon of a bulb fertilizer in the bottom of the hole. Place the bulb in the hole with the pointed end up.

Cover the bulb with soil and water thoroughly. A 5 cm layer of mulch on top of the bed will help prevent winter weeds, retain moisture and insulate against severe winter cold and temperature fluctuations.

Preparing a bed for fall planted bulbs
Prepare the bed - double digging will help to make a well-drained planting bed.
Condition the soil - Improve soil by adding three inches of peat moss and one inch of composted manure or a 3-in-1 soil mix. Then work into a depth of 30 cm. Add 1 kg bonemeal for every 92.9 m2 (1000 sq.ft.)
Plant — the sooner the better
Point bulb upward. Add sprinkle of blood meal or Actisol (with Hen Manure) to deter squirrels from stealing bulbs.

Add 2-5 cm of mulch.

After spring flowering the foliage must be allowed to remain to soak up sunshine and replenish the stored energy in the underground bulb. Only the flowering stems should be removed. In a few weeks, the foliage withers and dies down. This is the plant's natural defense against the too hot summer sun in its original habitat.


Replanting your flower bed with summer annuals gives you the opportunity to use more bone meal which, with its high phosphorous content, is beneficial to both the new planting and the bulbs.